Publications 32

Here we present a list of publications that were a result of projects funded by EuHIT or were published by members of EuHIT consortium.

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  • generic
    2018.
  • Article
    Liot, Olivier; Salort, Julien; Kaiser, Robert; du Puits, Ronald; Chillà, Francesca
    Journal of Fluid Mechanics. 2016, Vol. 786, p. 275-293. DOI: 10.1017/jfm.2015.649
    BOI
    • Keywords turbulent boundary layers, turbulent convection, turbulent flows
    • Abstract In this experimental work, the aim is to understand how turbulent thermal flows are enhanced by the destabilization of the boundary layers. Square-stud roughness elements have been added on the bottom plate of a rectangular Rayleigh–Bénard cell in air, to trigger instabilities in the boundary layers. The top plate is kept smooth. The cell proportions are identical to those of the water cell previously operated and described by Salort et al. (Phys. Fluids, vol. 26, 2014, 015112), but six times larger. The very large size of the Barrel of Ilmenau allows detailed velocity fields to be obtained using particle image velocimetry very close to the roughness elements. We found that the flow is quite different at low Rayleigh numbers, where there is no heat-transfer enhancement, and at high Rayleigh numbers where there is a heat-transfer enhancement due to the roughness. Below the transition, the fluid inside the notch, i.e. between the studs, is essentially at rest, though it is slowly recirculating. The velocity profiles on the top of obstacles and in grooves are fairly compatible with those obtained in the smooth case. Above the transition, on the other hand, we observe large incursions of the bulk inside the notch, and the velocity profiles on the top of obstacles are closer to the logarithmic profiles expected in the case of turbulent boundary layers.
  • Article
    Liot, O.; Salort, J.; Kaiser, R.; du Puits, R.; Chillà, F.
    Journal of Fluid Mechanics. 2016, Vol. 786, p. 275-293. DOI: 10.1017/jfm.2015.649
    • Publication URL https://www.cambridge.org/core/article/div-class-title-boundary-layer-structure-in-a-rough-rayleigh-benard-cell-filled-with-air-div/10160A8A9BD171A83DBE1427D7C6A2B9
    • Abstract In this experimental work, the aim is to understand how turbulent thermal flows are enhanced by the destabilization of the boundary layers. Square-stud roughness elements have been added on the bottom plate of a rectangular Rayleigh–Bénard cell in air, to trigger instabilities in the boundary layers. The top plate is kept smooth. The cell proportions are identical to those of the water cell previously operated and described by Salort et al. (Phys. Fluids, vol. 26, 2014, 015112), but six times larger. The very large size of the Barrel of Ilmenau allows detailed velocity fields to be obtained using particle image velocimetry very close to the roughness elements. We found that the flow is quite different at low Rayleigh numbers, where there is no heat-transfer enhancement, and at high Rayleigh numbers where there is a heat-transfer enhancement due to the roughness. Below the transition, the fluid inside the notch, i.e. between the studs, is essentially at rest, though it is slowly recirculating. The velocity profiles on the top of obstacles and in grooves are fairly compatible with those obtained in the smooth case. Above the transition, on the other hand, we observe large incursions of the bulk inside the notch, and the velocity profiles on the top of obstacles are closer to the logarithmic profiles expected in the case of turbulent boundary layers.
  • Article
    Talamelli, Alessandro; Persiani, Franco; Fransson, Jens H M; Alfredsson, P Henrik; Johansson, Arne V; Nagib, Hassan M; Rüedi, Jean-Daniel; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R; Monkewitz, Peter A
    Fluid Dynamics Research. 2009, Vol. 41, Issue 2, p. 21407. DOI: 10.1088/0169-5983/41/2/021407
    • Publication URL http://stacks.iop.org/1873-7005/41/i=2/a=021407
    • Abstract Although the equations governing turbulent flow of fluids are well known, understanding the overwhelming richness of flow phenomena, especially in high Reynolds number turbulent flows, remains one of the grand challenges in physics and engineering. High Reynolds number turbulence is ubiquitous in aerospace engineering, ground transportation systems, flow machinery, energy production (from gas turbines to wind and water turbines), as well as in nature, e.g. various processes occurring in the planetary boundary layer. High Reynolds number turbulence is not easily obtained in the laboratory, since in order to have good spatial resolution for measurements, the size of the facility itself has to be large. In this paper, we discuss limitations of various existing facilities and propose a new facility that will allow good spatial resolution even at high Reynolds number. The work is carried out in the framework of the Center for International Cooperation in Long Pipe Experiments (CICLoPE), an international collaboration that many in the turbulence community have shown an interest to participate in.
  • Article
    Tuliszka-Sznitko, Ewa; Kielczewski, Kamil
    Archives of Mechanics. 2016, Vol. 68, Issue 5, p. 395-418.
    RSC
    • Publication URL http://am.ippt.pan.pl/am/issue/view/209
    • Keywords Taylor-Couette flow, torque, DNS
    • Abstract In the paper the authors present the results obtained during a direct numerical simulation of the transitional TC flow in closed cavity. The spectral vanishing viscosity method is used to stabilized computations for higher Re. The attention is focused on the influence of the end-wall boundary conditions on the flow structures and on statistics i.e. the radial profiles of the angular velocity, angular momentum, torque and the Reynolds stress tensor components. The obtained data are discussed in the light of the experimental results and the numerical results published in literature.
    • Keywords baroclinic instability, double diffusive convection, geophysical fluid dynamics, environmental flows, rotating flows
    • Abstract A water-filled differentially heated rotating annulus with initially prepared stable vertical salinity profiles is studied in the laboratory. Based on twodimensional horizontal particle image velocimetry data and infrared camera visualizations, we describe the appearance and the characteristics of the baroclinic instability in this original configuration. First, we show that when the salinity profile is linear and confined between two non-stratified layers at top and bottom, only two separate shallow fluid layers can be destabilized. These unstable layers appear nearby the top and the bottom of the tank with a stratified motionless zone between them. This laboratory arrangement is thus particularly interesting to model geophysical or astrophysical situations where stratified regions are often juxtaposed to convective ones. Then, for more general but stable initial density profiles, statistical measures are introduced to quantify the extent of the baroclinic instability at given depths and to analyze the connections between this depth-dependence and the vertical salinity profiles. We find that, although the presence of stable stratification generally hinders full-depth overturning, double-diffusive convection can lead to development of multicellular sideways convection in shallow layers and subsequently to a multilayered baroclinic instability. Therefore we conclude that by decreasing the characteristic vertical scale of the flow, stratification may even enhance the formation of cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies (and thus, mixing) in a local sense.
  • Article
    Salort; Chabaud; Lévêque; Roche
    EPL. 2012, Vol. 97, p. 34006. DOI: 10.1209/0295-5075/97/34006
    • Publication URL https://doi.org/10.1209/0295-5075/97/34006
    • Abstract The 4/5-law of turbulence, which characterizes the energy cascade from large to small-sized eddies at high Reynolds numbers in classical fluids, is verified experimentally in a superfluid 4He wind tunnel, operated down to 1.56 K and up to Rλ≈1640. The result is corroborated by high-resolution simulations of Landau-Tisza’s two-fluid model down to 1.15 K, corresponding to a residual normal fluid concentration below 3 but with a lower Reynolds number of order Rλ≈100. Although the Kármán-Howarth equation (including a viscous term) is not valid a priori in a superfluid, it is found that it provides an empirical description of the deviation from the ideal 4/5-law at small scales and allows us to identify an effective viscosity for the superfluid, whose value matches the kinematic viscosity of the normal fluid regardless of its concentration.
  • Article
    Alessio, S.; Briatore, L.; Ferrero, E.; Longhetto, A.; Giraud, C.; Morra, O.
    Boundary-Layer Meteorology. 2014, Vol. 60, Issue 3, p. 235-241. DOI: 10.1007/BF00119377
    • Abstract We performed an experimental study using scale models in a hydrodynamic rotating channel, concerning the interactions between fluid flows and obstacles of different shapes. The study was meant to analyze the characteristics of the wakes observed on the lee side of quasi-bidimensional obstacles, in a neutral atmosphere.

      The obstacles were half-cylinders (with aspect ratio 0.87), placed transversally on the channel bottom and totally submerged in the fluid. We call them “quasi-bidimensional” since their width was a little smaller than the channel width, thus allowing the flow to partially go round their edges.

      The simulations were performed in the rotating hydraulic channel of ICG-CNR in Turin, and included various conditions of rotation period and flow speed. An interesting behaviour of the wakes was found on the lee side of subsynoptic-scale obstacles, modelled in conditions of Reynolds-Rossby similitude. More precisely, if a given threshold of flow velocity is exceeded, wake size is constant and is fully determined by the height of the obstacle.
  • Article
    Rusaouen; Chabaud; Salort; Roche
    Phys Fluids. 2017, Vol. 29, p. 105108. DOI: 10.1063/1.4991558
    • Publication URL https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4991558
    • Abstract The intermittency of turbulent superfluid helium is explored systematically in a steady wake flow from 1.28 K up to T>2.18K using a local anemometer. This temperature range spans relative densities of superfluids from 96 down to 0, allowing us to test numerical predictions of enhancement or depletion of intermittency at intermediate superfluid fractions. Using the so-called extended self-similarity method, scaling exponents of structure functions have been calculated. No evidence of temperature dependence is found on these scaling exponents in the upper part of the inertial cascade, where turbulence is well developed and fully resolved by the probe. This result supports the picture of a profound analogy between classical and quantum turbulence in their inertial range, including the violation of self-similarities associated with inertial-range intermittency.
  • Article
    Kaiser, Robert; du Puits, Ronald
    International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer. 2014, Vol. 73, p. 752-760. DOI: 10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2014.02.033
    BOI
    • Publication URL http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0017931014001501
    • Keywords Infrared thermography, Rayleigh–Bénard convection, Two-dimensional heat flux
    • Abstract We report highly resolved measurements of the local wall heat flux in turbulent Rayleigh–Bénard convection using an infrared camera. The measurements have been undertaken in a Rayleigh–Bénard cell with rectangular base of 2.50 m \( \times \) 0.65 m and a height of 2.5 m which is filled with air. First of all, it could be demonstrated that in a Rayleigh–Bénard cell with rectangular cross-section the time-averaged wall heat flux locally deviates by 30 from its mean. Furthermore, a strong correlation between the global flow structure inside the cell and the distribution of the local wall heat flux could be identified.